Video: VariCam LT Infrared Footage, I.R. Filter Removed

One of the often overlooked hidden gems of the Panasonic Varicam LT is the user-removable IR filter.

As Panasonic puts it:
“The Cinema VariCam LT has an integrated, detachable IR cut filter. This feature allows 4K image capture in extremely dark unlit nightscapes. This is ideal for capturing nocturnal wildlife and other scenes with no illumination. Also, the IR filter can be used in daylight as a creative tool for achieving a unique look.”

I recently worked with an astral photographer here in Portland who explained to me the reasons why a removable IR filter is such a killer feature for that line of work. The ability for an owner/operator to remove the IR filter themselves for a specific shoot is a great feature that sets the VariCam LT apart. Its not something that everyone will use but for a select crowd it could be a clincher.

See all of the VariCam LT pre-made packages here. Or you can contact us for custom packs with custom prices.

Check out the images here:

Alex Buono’s Art of Visual Story Telling Returns to the Northwest

The Portland-area native Alex Buono is bringing his Visual Storytelling 2 Tour back. It will expand your filmmaking abilities by immersing you in an all-day learning experience about the principles of Visual Style and Subtext. From his fast-turn around schedule as the DP of the SNL Film Unit to his role as the Co-Director/DP of the new IFC comedy series Documentary Now!, Alex is constantly challenged to recreate different looks. In this workshop, Alex will share his approach to shooting distinct visual styles with hands-on demonstrations that utilize attendees as the crew. By understanding the visual patterns for different film genres and how to manifest each style through both lighting and camerawork, you will harness the power of visual cues for your own projects.

The AVS2 tour is coming through Seattle on August 1st and through Portland on August 4th. For full ticket and registration information visit the website now. We had the pleasure of sponsoring Alex’s tour 2 summers ago in both Seattle and Portland. It was an amazing all day experience that we were lucky to be a part of once. Our excitement is through the roof to be a part of it again. Along with key sponsor Canon, Professional Video is the primary local sponsor for both of the Northwest stops, in Seattle and Portland. Visit the site to learn more details and to see the full list of pricing options and reserve your seat take a look at the registration page now. Use our EXCLUSIVE promo code AVS2LD to save money.

Alex Buono

Pro Video Partners with Portlands Indie Cinema Academy

Local Northwest filmmakers Ryan Walters and Tim Park have started a new website aimed at sharing their 20+ years of filmmaking experience. You may have seen some of Ryan’s own blog work reposted on popular video industry websites such as No Film School.com and Creative Planet. Now the duo is bringing you Indie Cinema Academy.com .

Indie Cinema Academy delivers in depth camera & lighting training for anyone who desires a cinematic look for their projects. Ryan & Tim share the tricks of the trade that they’ve accumulated in their work on feature films, national commercials, and corporate videos. They have designed the curriculum to ensure that the training is applicable & accessible to all levels of production.

Indie Cinema Academy’s website contains a deep array of lessons and articles that take the form of video features or text instructions. Some of this content is completely free to the general public. To take your education further a minimal fee is requested of ether $119 or $149 (depending on what features you want) for 12 months of access.

Professional Video is a huge believer in the idea that  education is key to bringing creativity to its full potential. We know that by properly educating a customer on a piece of equipment the customer can then make the right gear-buying decision for themselves. And that is applicable on high-end equipment and entry level. Because of this belief in education we have partnered with Indie Cinema Academy to help spread the knowledge base a little further. Take a look at what Indie Cinema Academy had to offer. Sign up today and take your knowledge to the next level.

ICA Logo

CMVS ’14: Still Motion Presents Force of Habit: It’s Holding You Back

Join Amina Moreau of Stillmotion for a discussion about the art of the purposeful choice. Never again will you choose a camera just because it’s cool. Or use a certian kid of stabilizer just because it’s already attached to your rig. And perhaps most excitingly, never again will you approach a scene in a certain way just because it’s how you’ve always done it. We’re going to discuss why you choose the lens you use, why a certain camera is the right fit, why you use specific settings on your camera, and more.

Whether you’re fairly new to filmmaking or a seasoned veteran, there’s one thing we can find in common: It’s easy to fall into patterns. At first glance, that’s not so bad really. We find what works, and we stick with it. Why fix something if it ain’t broke? Because that’s just not how creativity works.

To keep things fresh and challenging, and to grow as storytellers, we need to push beyond our habits. We need to commit to making meaningful decisions, ones that are truly story-relevant.

The presentation will take place on February 26th. Part 1 will be at 11:30am and Part 2 will be at 3:30pm. You can register for the show here and attend for free.

Amina0021

CMVS ’14: The Making of Still Motion’s Documentary

Portland production company Still Motion is hosting workshops on modern filmmaking technique and tools. Still Motion excels at modern event film production but they also recently produced their first feature documentary. It was primarily shot with Canon C100 and 5D cameras. Check out this amazing behind the scenes making-of video.

Amina Moreau of Still Motion will be hosting these workshops on February 26th. Part 1 will be at 11:30am and Part 2 will be at 3:30pm. Register to attend these workshops here.

making of

CMVS ’14: Production Co. Still Motion Hosting Workshop

Amina Moreau of Portland production company Still Motion will be putting on an in-depth workshop sponsored by Canon. Who is Still Motion? Lets let the till you:

Stillmotion is a tireless group of borderline workaholics united by our passions in life: film, education, competitive office-wide sporting events, snacks, and most importantly — storytelling. Capturing a meaningful story is never easy, but it’s the process and rewards of great storytelling that keep us coming back to the challenge.

The goal of Stillmotion EDU is simple: we want to help people tell better stories. This means not only finding the great stories, but finding the best techniques to tell those stories in a powerful way. Stillmotion knows how difficult this process can be, and our EDU team is here to help you get started.

The Still Motion blog was designed to bring together all of the dimensions that make up Stillmotion and create a space for people to read, watch, learn, and discover new opportunities. We have so much filmmaking experience to offer, and the Still Motion blog is where we share it with you.

Check out the trailer for their documentary titled #StandWithMe . The documentary was primarily shot with Canon C100 and 5D cameras.

The workshop will take place on February 26th. Part 1 will be at 11:30am and Part 2 will be at 3:30pm. You can register for the show here and attend for free.

#StandWithMe

Cadrage is an Amazing Directors Viewfinder App

Cadrage is a new viewfinder app for iPhone/iPad and Android phones that enables you to preview shots more conveniently and very accurately with all the indie cameras we like. Cadrage comes from the startup company distant blue. You might have been using a director’s viewfinder app to plan your shots before. I’ve had several on my phone since they came out, because they are very useful when it comes to location scouting, choosing lenses and previewing a scene quickly. Basically they use your iPhone camera and digital zoom to accurately preview a certain lens/sensor combination and help you find the right focal length to get your shot. The nice thing about the Cadrage app is that all the cameras we know and love are included and the design / ergonomics finally fulfill a certain standard. Additionally there’s a function to effectively calibrate your phones camera to deliver perfect results. It sells for $11.

Cadrage_iPhone_Viewfinder

What Gear Do Documentary Filmmakers Use?

The PBS documentary show POV recently conducted a survey of filmmakers regarding the equipment they use. The survey was conducted in September of 147 filmmakers. There are a few things to consider. Most of these documentaries would have been put into production in 2011 or 2012 with only some of them being shot in 2013. Digital cinema cameras like the Sony FS700, F5, and Canon C100 weren’t on the market when most of these were shot. Even the C300 would have only been on the market a short while and at a higher price point. It will be very interesting to see how these numbers shift over the next 12-18 moths. Here are some key points:

Cameras: Most popular single camera: Canon EOS C300, however if you combine 5DmkII and 5DmkIII then that becomes the most popular camera by a large margin.

Specialty Camera: nearly 1/3 of docs used a Canon consumer camcorder to get “discreet” footage.

Lenses: Since most people shot with Canon cameras most people used Canon lenses. However i thought it was interesting that the most common 3rd party option was Zeiss. At Professional Video we often preach the advantage of Zeiss all mechanical lenses.

Editing: Over 75% of editors used some form of Final Cut Pro, ether 7 or 10, in their post. Over 90% of post was done on a Mac.

Support: My personal favorite tripod, the Sachtler FSB8 with the carbon sticks, was also one of the most frequently used documentary tripods.

Buy or Rent: Nearly 85% of documentary filmmakers purchased their primary camera. A documentary can often mean many many hours of production at unusual schedules. Owning might have advantages when compared with commercial or narrative filmmaking.

View the whole thing here. Post by Eric C. Petrie

POV Survey

Arri Alexa vs. Canon Cinema EOS

How do you think a $5,000 Canon C100 stacks up against a $50,000 Arri Alexa? Lets find out. Shane Hurlbut was the D.P. on “Need for Speed”. Before they began shooting the film he performed extensive testing on the Arri Alexa compared to the Canon C500. He did exhaustive testing on technical elements as well as aesthetic elements. Clear your calendar and prepare for a long and detailed read. A big point that i want to stress is that the sensor in the C500 is the exact same sensor that is in the C300 and C100. If you are recording 1080p onto an external ProRes recorder the results from all 3 cameras will be identical. For those who think the C100 is just a glorified DSLR please read this review and consider that the C100 is actually a stripped down C500. Read the full article here.

main-event_sm

Canon C300 & Cine Lens Indie Film Testimonial

The movie’s budget was ultra-low, the shooting schedule just 21 days, and the “studio” mostly the mean streets and cramped tenements of Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Add a first-time director/screenwriter who is also portraying the film’s main character, and it was clear that making “Straight Outta Tompkins” presented multiple challenges. Nevertheless, director Zephyr Benson and DP Brandon Roots shot the film by combining diligent effort, expert collaborators, and the image quality, high mobility, and superb low-light performance of an EOS C300 cinema camera (and cinema prime and zoom lenses) from Canon, U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions. A gritty, cautionary tale of a young drug dealer, “Straight Outta Tompkins” is 21-year-old Benson’s debut feature and yet another example of the ongoing democratization in filmmaking made possible by affordable, high-performance digital cameras such as the EOS C300.

“Not so long ago, it would have been nearly impossible to make a movie of this quality, so quickly, as an ultra-low budget feature,” Benson noted. “With the Canon EOS C300 camera, however, my vision became a reality. I think that any filmmaker with a powerful enough desire to tell a story can now just get out there and do it.” Benson speaks from an informed viewpoint. The son of accomplished director, screenwriter, actor, and educator Robby Benson, Zephyr was introduced to filmmaking early on by accompanying his father to film sets and sitting-in on his lectures at various universities and film schools. Chief among the lessons he learned was that moviemaking is hard work.

“A lot of challenges can be thrown at you every day,” Zephyr confided. “Many young filmmakers don’t realize this at first. You can spend hours just setting-up one shot so it looks right and then everything can suddenly go wrong. Then you’ve got to brainstorm and figure out how to make it right, which is the challenge of filmmaking and one of the reasons why I love it. I learned more than I had ever learned in my entire life during the pre-production and filming of this movie. And throughout it all, it was great to look over to my DP and realize that the one thing we didn’t have to worry about was our camera.”

“I don’t think we would have been able to make this movie without the Canon EOS C300 camera,” agreed DP Brandon Roots. “From the very beginning we knew that we wanted to shoot the film handheld, so the lightweight body of the EOS C300 camera was quite important, especially since it was on my shoulder most of the time. We also knew we would be working in really tight interior locations, so mobility would be vital. The compact design of the EOS C300 camera and the Canon lenses we used enabled us to be quite agile, which made all the difference in our ability to shoot where we wanted to.”

With a camera body weighing just over 3 lbs., the Canon EOS C300 camera is equipped with a high-sensitivity Canon Super 35mm CMOS sensor, outstanding Canon DIGIC DV III image processor, and a 50 Mbps 4:2:2 MPEG-2 codec for superb cinematic picture quality. The EOS C300 cinema camera is engineered to deliver full 1920 x 1080 HD and provides a selectable ISO range up to 20,000 for outstanding low-light performance.

“Our budget dictated minimal lighting, but the Canon EOS C300 camera has amazing low-light performance,” Roots informed “A large part of the film takes place at night on city streets, and we used available light. We filmed in interior locations as well. We routinely shot up to 3200 ISO, which on some other cameras would have resulted in a lot of noise and an undesirable image, but not with the EOS C300 camera. The low-light performance of the EOS C300 camera also saved us from needing an electrical generator for extra lights. We were able to power the few lights we needed off the available power at locations or the outlets in the apartments we used.”

Zephyr Benson recalled a particular instance in which the low-light performance of the Canon EOS C300 cinema camera moved him to describe it as “the most incredible thing” he’d ever seen. “One night we were shooting on a fire escape, looking down a poorly lit street that, to the naked eye, was barely visible beyond about 30 yards,” he recalled. “Brandon turned on the Canon EOS C300 camera and everything instantly looked illuminated and cinematic. It looked as if we had spent hours lighting the entire block. That was so important for this film because our ultra-low budget gave us hardly any time for lighting set-ups.”

“There was virtually no lighting on that street at all, it was very dark and dim,” added co-executive producer David Rudd. “Brandon turned to us and said ‘I can’t believe what I can see through this camera.’ The Canon EOS C300 camera really digs down into the dark areas of light. It loves the low end of the spectrum. On another occasion we lit a small interior location just by bouncing the glow of a Mini Maglite® off the ceiling. We didn’t have the time, budget, or manpower to do anywhere near the lighting you would normally do for a film of this kind, so the Canon EOS C300 camera was extremely beneficial to our project, as were the fast Canon cinema prime lenses we used.”

Straight Outta Tompkins was photographed principally with the Canon CN-E24mm T1.5 LF, CN-E50mm T1.3 LF, and CN-E85mm T1.33 LF cinema prime lenses. DP Brandon Roots also used the Canon CN-E14.5-60mm T2.6 L SP cinema zoom lens and the CN-E30-105mm T2.8 L SP compact cinema zoom lens. “The Canon cinema prime lenses are fast and lightweight, and because we were shooting hand-held they gave us great flexibility for shooting in low light,” Roots explained. “More often than not we were living on the primes.”

“We used the Canon cinema zoom lenses more for daytime exterior street scenes,” Roots continued. “They gave us the greatest flexibility by enabling us to adjust our framing and move quickly from one set-up to another. We were shooting guerilla-style and the zooms were incredibly versatile in those situations. We used the larger Canon CN-E14.5-60mm T2.6 L SP cinema zoom lens a lot more than I expected we would. We were ‘running-and-gunning’ the whole time, and the flexibility that zoom gave us when we didn’t have enough time to do a lens change was very helpful and allowed us to move more quickly. The Canon CN-E30-105mm T2.8 L SP compact cinema zoom lens was the longest lens we had, so we used it whenever we needed to get really tight on a shot. There were a number of times where it allowed us to get incredibly close to capture dramatic moments as they happened.”

Developed for contemporary 4K, 2K, and HD production standards, all of the Canon cinema lenses provide outstanding and consistent optical quality, as well as uniform gear positions, rotation angles, and 136mm front diameters for compatibility with matte boxes and other third-party accessories. The lenses also feature highly visible engraved focus scales for convenient operation, motion-picture style mechanical/tactile operation, and an 11-blade aperture diaphragm for creative background blurring.

Roots described the Canon cinema prime and zoom lenses as “incredibly sharp even when we were shooting wide open” He added: “I love how true these lenses were to the images that we were shooting. I’ve seen other lenses that make the image soft or apply some kind of ‘look’ to the scene. Canon cinema prime and zoom lenses don’t do that. They are incredibly accurate, sharp, and clean. What we saw was what we got.”

“I’m a photographer, and I adore the look of the images produced using Canon lenses, which is beautifully warm without being overly saturated,” added co-executive producer Robby Benson. “The Canon cinema prime lenses are remarkably fast and crisp. They allowed us to shoot things at night, which – for an independent film – is a blessing. We actually saw things through these cinema lenses – on the monitor – with better low-light perception than our eyes were capable of.”

The Canon EOS C300 cinema camera records to two CF (Compact Flash) cards through dual slots with a choice of serial or parallel (for backup) recording, providing up to 80 minutes of recording time on each 32GB card. “The dual CF card slots are a smart design,” said Roots. “We didn’t have to worry about filling up a card and losing a shot.”

Roots and Robby Benson also noted the advantages of the camera’s SMPTE time code capability. “It helped us immensely in post with synching up all of the sound and picture.” Robby Benson noted: “Even if you shoot a ton of footage, if you play by the rules and know what you’re doing in post, the EOS C300 camera time code feature enables you to find anything you’ve shot.”

Straight Outta Tompkins was filmed in the EOS C300 cinema camera’s Canon Log gamma setting, which helps ensure capture of the full exposure latitude that the camera’s Super 35mm CMOS sensor is capable of. Canon Log gamma image data provides the film-style dynamic range between shadows and highlights that is essential for achieving cinematic subtleties in post-production color grading. “It’s spectacular the latitude that the image gave us and how much detail we had in shadows and highlights,” Roots reported. “It was also great to know right from the beginning that we would be able to do a really fine color grade later on during post.”

“When we went to the post house to do a test on our material, Randy Coonfield, colorist from Shapeshifter Post, was amazed with the Canon EOS C300 camera and Canon lenses,” recalled Robby Benson. “We were giving the film more blues and grit, and we had the latitude to take it to places no other project I’ve ever worked on could go. The blacks got blacker; not muddy – no noise, just rich – and the colors were so defined, with exquisite clarity. When we needed more illumination – again, no noise – Coonfield turned to me and David and just said, ‘It’s the camera…it’s the camera and the lenses. Remarkable.’”

Above and beyond its role as the camera that enabled the ultra-low budget Straight Outta Tompkins to get made with high-end cinematic quality in a short space of time, all four filmmakers had special praise for the impact that the Canon EOS C300 cinema camera is having on independent production in general.

“The Canon EOS C300 – as well as Canon’s entire line of EOS cameras – has democratized filmmaking,” Roots stated. “It is amazing to see this footage projected on a big screen. The audience doesn’t know what format we shot it on, nor should it matter to them. It just looks great.”

“Democratized moviemaking – storytelling – is probably the most exciting thing that could ever happen,” Robby Benson emphasized. “Now young filmmakers, older filmmakers, and anyone can tell their story. Of course, you first have to be a good storyteller. That’s always true, regardless of budget. The Canon EOS C300 is a dream camera for low-budget filmmakers. It, and Canon’s cinema prime and zoom lenses, are fully cinematic. I’m a believer in this equipment.”

“What it really boils down to is that Canon is showing the way of the future of filmmaking,” Rudd added. “Nowadays you’ve got to maintain quality while budgets keep dwindling away. You also need a camera that records all the picture information you need. The EOS C300 camera does all of this and more. It makes it possible to tell your stories so they look good. There’s a lot of projects that can be done now because of this camera.”

“The Canon EOS C300 cinema camera makes it possible to make your movie on an ultra-low budget,” Zephyr Benson concluded. “Now aspiring moviemakers can just go and do it. I can’t thank Canon enough for this.”

canon-eos-c300-benson